Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Chinese New Year 2015: Celebrate the Year of the Sheep

Su Wu , The Lonely Shepherd
by

Ren Bonian, 1840- 1895
February 19, 2015 begins the Year of the Sheep according to the Chinese Zodiac. (Also recognized as the Year of the Ram or the Year of the Goat)
In Ancient China the sheep symbolized justice. According to legend a divine sheep called xiezhi was able to recognize wrongdoers, and would gore them in punishment. Judges wore and images of the xiezhi on their hats as a symbol of impartiality.



In Guangzhou, China, there is a statue commemorating the Five Sheep. It is said that the people used to eat only fish, until five gods came to earth riding on five sheep. Each sheep was a different color and held an ear of rice in its mouth.  The gods instructed the people to plant the rice and blessed the city against famine. The gods flew back to the sky but the sheep remained standing until they became stones. Guangzhou is nicknamed “Five Sheep City”, and all sheep are believed to be lucky.

Above information from the following sites:
http://www.chinaculture.org/gb/en_madeinchina/2005-10/21/content_74782_14.htm
http://waypastnormal.blogspot.com/2012/04/sheep-in-legend-and-lore-special-joint.html

Since different sites state it is the year of the sheep, goat or ram, I offer you stories on all of these wonderful creatures.

SHEEP

Anyone that can walk three circles around a sleeping sheep will get his wish. 
                                                                                           ~ Icelandic Folklore

The Hyena and the Sheep - Somalia
http://hooyo.web.free.fr/E_tale_13.html

The Lion, the Cow, the She-Goat and the Sheep - Aesop
http://www.mythfolklore.net/aesopica/oxford/14.htm

The Sharp, Grey Sheep – Gaelic/West Highlands
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/cinderella/stories/sheep.html

The Sheep and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://oaks.nvg.org/ntales47.html

The Sheep, the Lamp, the Wolf and the Hare - Tibet
http://members.home.nl/marcmarti/yugur/folktale/tale10b.htm

The Shepherd’s Mistake - India

http://mocomi.com/indian-folk-tales-the-shepherds-mistake/

The Sky is Falling - Ethiopia

Why the Stork Eats Frogs and the Wolf Hunts Sheep - Ukraine

http://www.4to40.com/folktales/print.asp?p=Why_The_Stork_Eats_Frogs_And_The_Wolf_Hunts_Sheep


RAM

The Goat and the Ram - Russia
http://whisperingbooks.com/Show_Page/?book=Russian_Folk_Tales&story=Goat_And_Ram 

The Tiger, the Ram and the Jackal – South Africa
http://www.sacred-texts.com/afr/saft/sft06.htm


The Ram and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://hazel.forest.net/whootie/stories/ram_pig_house_norway.html

The Wolves, the Sheep and the Lamb – Aesop
http://www.mythfolklore.net/aesopica/oxford/31.htm

GOAT


The Dog, the Goat and the Donkey – Ethiopia
http://www.ethiopianfolktales.com/en/somalia/210-the-dog-the-goat-and-the-donkey

The Goat-Face Girl – Andrew Lang
http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/4890/

The Lad With the Goat Skin - Celtic
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cft/cft29.htm

The Sheep, the Goat and the Dog – Chad
http://www.tchad.org/research/folktales.html#truck

Three Billy Goat’s Gruff – Three versions: Norway, Poland, Germany
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0122e.html

When the Hyena and the Billy Goat Signed a Peace Treaty – Chad
http://www.tchad.org/research/folktales.html#peace

CRAFTS

A number of easy, preschool sheep/lamb crafts and activities.

DLTK-KIDS 
http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/lambs.htm

Danielle’s Place
http://www.daniellesplace.com/html/sheepcrafts.html

 CURRICULUM

First School – Preschool goat themed activities.
Sheep and Lamb
http://www.first-school.ws/theme/animals/farm/lamb.htm
Goat
http://www.first-school.ws/activities/animals/farm/goat.htm


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

The Chinese New Year ends with the Lantern Festival, celebrated at night with displays and parades of painted lanterns. The highlight of the Lantern Festival is the Dragon Dance. Beautiful dragons made of paper, silk and bamboo are held overhead, and appear to dance as they make their way along the parade routes.

Storybug.net: Dragons - Mythical, Mystical, Magical Creatures! – Here is a previous blog post filled with dragon tails, curriculum, crafts and more to augment your Chinese New Year celebration.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2011/05/dragons-mythical-mystical-magical.html 


Below are previous blog posts I wrote for the Chinese New Year. You will find useful background information to augment your Chinese New Year programs.

Year of the Horse
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/chinese-new-year-year-of-horse.html

Year of the Snake
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/12/celebrate-chinese-new-year-2013-year-of.html

Year of the Tiger
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2009/12/2010-year-of-tiger.html 

Gung Hay Fat Choy
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2008/02/gung-hay-fat-choy.html

Last year I wrote a blog for the end of March: March Goes Out  Like a Lamb. Since lambs are baby sheep I thought you might find something to add to your Chinese New Year Program here.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/03/march-goes-out-like-lambfolktales-and.html

Karen Chace 2014 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.
 

Monday, December 29, 2014

Following the Breadcrumbs XXI: Stor e Telling November December 2005

Hansel and Gretel
by
Richard Scholz, 1905
I am traveling back in time and updating all of my Stor e Telling columns for Storytelling Magazine since 2002. I have checked all of the links, updated those that have new URL's and deleted others that have found their way to the Internet graveyard.

I will continue to update the columns and post them on my blog until all of the breadcrumbs lead to the end of 2006. At the end of the blog you will find links to the columns from 2002 - 2004 and 2007 - 2013.


I continue to write for Storytelling Magazine but will not be adding current columns until the following year. If you want immediate access to the newest websites, consider becoming a member of the 
National Storytelling Network and support the arts!  Please feel free to comment on the blog and let me know if you find this useful. 

The Children’s Book of Christmas Stories
Classic tales dating back to 1926.

Folktales.net                                                                                                                               Storyteller Eshu Bumpus generously shares a selection of folktales, high lightening the seven principles of Kwanzaa.
http://www.folktales.net/Kwanza1.html

How To Say “Merry Christmas!”Planning on hosting a holiday party? From Afrikaner to Welsh, you will be able to greet your guests in their native tongue.

Hasidic Stories
F
rom the website of storyteller Doug Lipman, a fantastic selection of stories. http://www.hasidicstories.com/stories1.html

Mything Links – Yuletide Around the WorldAn annotated and illustrated collection with links to Mythologies, Fairy Tales, Folklore, Sacred Arts and Sacred Traditions around the globe.

Planetpals.comSpice up your holiday stories with two easy to do origami folds; a star http://www.planetpals.com/ppcraft2.html
and a Christmas tree. http://www.tammyyee.com/origamitree.html

Sources for Jewish Folktales and StoriesA useful bibliography of tales for both children and adults.
http://databases.jewishlibraries.org/bibliography-bank

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Stor e Telling Columns 2002 – 2004
All 16 blog bogs, with a brief synopsis for reach one in an easy to access post at the link below.http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/stor-e-telling-resources-2002-2004.html


2005

January February - Fables from Aesop and Robert Lewis Stevenson, spooky stories in time for Halloween, resources sponsored by the California Council for the Humanities, myths and legends from the British Isles and more.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-xvi-stor-e.html

March April -  Sites on Buddhist Studies, Cambodian folktales, lesson plans, public domain music from a variety of cultures, myths, legends and more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-stor-e-telling.html

May June - There are resources for song lyrics, lessons plans connected to our historical parks in the USA, Hodja, Birbel and Jakata stories, over 544 dragon tales and more.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xviii-stor-e.html

July August - Ballad and folk songs resources from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and America. Also, resources on Hans Christian Anderson, sea songs and shanties, and a list of contact information for state and regional art councils and agencies.

September October - Links to Victorian Ghost Stories, folklore and legends from around the world, children’s activities to complement your storytelling programs, and Hodja tales. For the classroom, Beyond the Fire offers real-life stories of 15 teenagers, now living in the U.S., who have survived war in seven war zones, along with lesson plans and timelines.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xx-stor-e-telling.html

2007 - 2012

Stor e Telling Columns 2007-2012
All 31 blog posts, along with a brief synopsis for each one, in an easy to access post at the link below.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html 



2013

From 1001 Night to 2001 Story Resources – This link will lead to you one blog post with all of my columns from 2013.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html


Karen Chace 2014 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at 
storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Sunday, November 30, 2014

Following the Breadcrumbs XX: Stor e Telling September October 2005

Hans and Gretel
by
Richard Scholz, 1905
I am traveling back in time and updating all of my Stor e Telling columns for Storytelling Magazine since 2002. I have checked all of the links, updated those that have new URL's and deleted others that have found their way to the Internet graveyard. Through the summer and beyond I will continue to update the columns and post them on my blog until all of the breadcrumbs lead to the end of 2006. At the end of the blog you will find links to the columns from 2002 - 2004 and 2007 - 2013.



I continue to write for Storytelling Magazine but will not be adding current columns until the following year. If you want immediate access to the newest websites, consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network and support the arts!

  
Please feel free to comment on the blog and let me know if you find this useful. 

American Folklore ~ Halloween StoriesRegional ghost stories from around the United States; just in time to make your frightful night “ghoul”icious!
http://www.americanfolklore.net/halloween.html

Beyond the Fire: Teen Experiences of War
Real-life stories of 15 teenagers, now living in the U.S., who have survived war in seven  war zones: Somalia, Sudan, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Kosovo, and Iraq. Includes lesson plans and conflict timelines, and links to related sites.
Copyright 2005 by Librarians' Index to the Internet, LII.  http://lii.org/
http://archive.itvs.org/beyondthefire/
The Center for the Book
From the Library of Congress, a listing of book fairs, storytelling festivals, and literary events around the country.
http://www.loc.gov/loc/cfbook/bookfair.html

First School
Searching for the perfect activity to complement your program? Use the searchable database to make your program shine!
http://www.first-school.ws/

Folklore and Legend
Get ready to cruise the continents! From Africa to Sweden, surf creation stories, myths, Tall Tales and, along with information on Gods, Goddesses, mythical creatures, fables and proverbs.
*This site is no longer active but the stories can still be accessed via the Wayback Machine.
https://web.archive.org/web/20060328183951/http://folkloreandmyth.netfirms.com/index.html

Hodja Stories
Delight in the stories from Once the Hodja and Nasreddin Hodja as you peruse the cyber pages offered by scholar Jeremy Schiff.
http://www.cs.biu.ac.il/~schiff/Hodja/index.html

KidsStuffCanada.com
Are you working with the wee ones? Here are some creative, downloadable coloring pages to complement the stories of Grimm and Andersen. There are also interactive pages for Christmas, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Tall Tales; enough activities to keep you coloring outside the lines until the New Year!
http://www.kidstuffcanada.com/en/

Mythography
Explore the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, and the legends of the Celts. The site also offers resources and reference materials, and a dictionary that explains Greek, Roman, and Celtic terms and words.
http://www.loggia.com/myth/myth.html

Quilts and Quiltmaking in America 1978-1996
This site "showcases materials from two American Folklife Center collections, the Blue Ridge Parkway Folklife Project Collection (1978) and the All-American Quilt Contest." Includes nearly 200 segments from recorded interviews with quiltmakers and over 400 images.
Copyright 2005 by Librarians' Index to the Internet, LII.  http://lii.org/
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/qlthtml/

Victorian Ghost Stories
Twenty-two ghost stories from such spectral luminaries as Bram Stoker, Arthur Conan Doyle and Charles Dickens.
http://www.lang.nagoya-u.ac.jp/~matsuoka/ghost-stories.html

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Stor e Telling Columns 2002 – 2004
All 16 blog bogs, with a brief synopsis for reach one in an easy to access post at the link below.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/stor-e-telling-resources-2002-2004.html

2005

January February - Fables from Aesop and Robert Lewis Stevenson, spooky stories in time for Halloween, resources sponsored by the California Council for the Humanities, myths and legends from the British Isles and more.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-xvi-stor-e.html

March April - At the link you will find sites on Buddhist Studies, Cambodian folktales, lesson plans, public domain music from a variety of cultures, myths, legends and more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-stor-e-telling.html

May June - There are resources for song lyrics, lessons plans connected to our historical parks in the USA, Hodja, Birbel and Jakata stories, over 544 dragon tales and more.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xviii-stor-e.html

July August - Ballad and folk songs resources from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and America. Also, resources on Hans Christian Anderson, sea songs and shanties, and a list of contact information for state and regional art councils and agencies.

2007 - 2012

Stor e Telling Columns 2007-2012
All 31 blog posts, along with a brief synopsis for each one, in an easy to access post at the link below.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html 


2013

From 1001 Night to 2001 Story Resources – This link will lead to you one blog post with all of my columns from 2013.http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html 

Karen Chace 2014 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at 
storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Dialogue and Dancing! New Storytelling Activities

Children Playing Musical Chairs
Antique Postcard, 1910
I have taught storytelling for almost 13 years and have noticed that combining written assignments for a specific storytelling tool, followed by a game that reinforces their writing, is very effective. This week I decided to try new written and interactive activity to help my students balance narrative and dialogue in their stories.
First, I gave them the Language Ladder exercise to help them recognize where they could use dialogue on sections too heavy with narration.



 

I shared the examples on the handout, asking them to change narrative to dialogue to be sure they understood the process.  They were then instructed to find three places in their stories where they could do the same. Some needed a bit of guidance while others immediately found ways to move the story forward.  Here are some of the changes they made:


  • Original sentence: When the old woman saw what had happened, she was very discouraged about raising bananas.
  • New Sentence: The old woman was very discouraged. “What will I ever do? I can no longer raise bananas!” 
  • Original Sentence: The monkey with the loudest voice was to shout his loudest to the sun and ask for help.
  • New Sentence: “Sun! Come help us! Our friend is stuck!” 
  • Original Sentence: She avoided reflections and mirrors at all costs.
  • New Sentence: “I must never look in a mirror again.”

After they shared their work we moved to an interactive exercise.  I arranged the chairs, front to back, for the game Musical Chairs. Joey, one of my students, cued up the song Happy by Pharrell Williams on his IPhone and the game began.  They had a blast singing and dancing to the music as they tried their best to ensure they were not the one left without a chair. When I stopped the music, the student left standing chose a line of dialogue from their written works, delivering it as the character, complete with vocal expression and body language. Everyone had a great time and the students left to watch the game danced and cheered everyone on.
Afterwards, we stepped outside into the enclosed, library courtyard. (It was a beautiful, warm day and they were delighted to be in the fresh air!)  I lined everyone up with enough space between them so they wouldn’t bump into each other, tandem students with their partners. They were then asked to tell their stories aloud as they circled the courtyard, adding the new dialogue they created from the written exercise. Not only did this reinforce the previous activities, but it had the added benefit of helping them find additional, natural gestures to include in their telling.

It was a good day! It reinforced the storytelling tools and added fun and camaraderie to our time together. In this season of thanks I am grateful for the opportunity to work with these amazing children who are always willing to work and play!

Y
ou can find more original written and interactive exercises for your storytelling troupe in my new book, Story by Story: Creating a School Storytelling Troupe. And if you missed last week's new storytelling activity, Dicing Up Your Story, you can find it at the link. http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/dicing-up-your-story-new-storytelling.html

Please let
me know if you find these activities useful in your work; I would love to hear your thoughts.
 

Karen Chace 2014 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Dicing Up Your Story: New Storytelling Activity

Song Dynasty
by
Su Hanchen, mid 12th Century
Yesterday I met with my sixth and seventh grade storytelling troupe. They have already selected their stories so we spent some time identifying where they could add gestures as they told their tales.

I began by asking them to tell aloud, separately, and simultaneously. As I walked around the room, listening and watching, I noticed many natural movements coming to life.  One student, Soraya, was completely immersed in the story; her body bent forward, arms outstretched, her face displaying all the hallmarks of an intense conversation as she spoke some of the dialogue. So convincing was her body language I had to look twice to see if she was actually speaking with another student. When I remarked on it later during our discussion, she was surprised by my description. She truly didn’t realize what she was doing; it was a natural extension of stepping into her story.


After everyone finished I asked them to complete the written exercise,
Giant Gestures, then called everyone into a circle. Using a large, foam dice each student took turns tossing it. Whatever number came up they performed that number of gestures from their story, while explaining the part of the story the gesture complemented. Since the numbers went from one to six, and the written exercise only asked for five gestures, if six came up they shared five gestures and one facial expression.


They had a great time and didn’t want to stop. Luke, another student asked, “Do you know the Wonder Ball song?” He suggested we pass the dice as we sang the song, and the student left holding the dice would share a gesture. I liked the idea and added, “Since three is the magic number in fairytales let’s share two gestures and one facial expression.” Once a student was ‘out’ they sat in the middle of the circle urging their friends on.

I can easily imagine this dice being used for other story parts as well. Perhaps you might attach something specific to each number. For example:
#1 = gesture
#2 = two lines of dialogue
#3 = three facial expressions
#4 = four adjectives to describe someone in your story
#5 = use your five senses to describe the setting of your story
#6 = share six (major or minor) events that happen in your story

* These games are free for you to use in your work. However, I  do ask that you respect copyright and offer attribution.
 

After both games they completed a second written exercise, Story Snapshot. I was delighted to read the highly descriptive and detailed answers they gave for the questions. The combination of telling their stories aloud, completing Giant Gestures first, transitioning to activities that engaged the entire body, and back to one last written exercise, Story Snapshot, worked! The entire process complemented and reinforced their gestures, facial expression, story sequence, imagination, and team spirit, and they had fun in the process!

Next week I will try out a new activity, based on another childhood game. I will let you know how it turns out!
* Both exercises, Giant Gestures and Story Snapshot can be found in my book,
Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe.


Note: Yes, I know that normally the singular for dice is die. However, when I double checked before posting the blog this is what I read: The New Oxford Dictionary of English, Judy Pearsall, Patrick Hanks (1998) states that “In modern standard English, the singular die (rather than dice) is uncommon. Dice is used for both the singular and the plural.”


Karen Chace 2014 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Monday, November 17, 2014

Following the Breadcrumbs XIX: Stor e Telling July August 2005

Hansel and Gretel
by
Richard Scholz, 1905
I am traveling back in time and updating all of my Stor e Telling columns for Storytelling Magazine since 2002 I have checked all of the links, updated those that have new URL's and deleted others that have found their way to the Internet graveyard.

I will continue to update the columns and post them on my blog until all of the breadcrumbs lead to the end of 2006. At the end of the blog you will find links to the columns from 2002 - 2004 and 2007 - 2013.


I continue to write for Storytelling Magazine but will not be adding current columns until the following year. If you want immediate access to the newest websites, consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network and support the arts!  Please feel free to comment on the blog and let me know if you find this useful. 


Get ready for all of those campfire storytelling performances this summer. Two sites chock full of songs, skits, finger plays, chants, jokes, riddles, tongue twister and stories to keep the scouts swinging and swaying.
The Macscouter
http://www.macscouter.com/

Tail Slap - This site is no longer active but you can still access all the fun via the Wayback Machine link.
http://web.archive.org/web/20050209110552/http://www.hwdsb.on.ca/tailslap/funstuff.htm

The California Institute for Ancient Studies
If you are producing a program on ancient history or the bible, this site is worth a visit. From Agamemnon to Zoster, this site offers information on Egyptian and Biblical figures. There are also chronological charts, graphs, timelines, maps and pictures.
http://www.specialtyinterests.net/index.html

Contemplations from the Marianis Trench
Hundreds of ballads and folk songs from England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales and America. Also lyrics, background information and midi files so you can revel in the music while you surf. Thanks to Granny Sue Holstein for sharing this site.
http://www.contemplator.com/

The Hans Christian Andersen Center
In celebration of HCA’s  200th anniversary I offer you this incredible site; a dazzling array of information on his life and works, with additional links to music, manuscripts, illustrations, and more. You can even read his works in 123 different languages
http://www.andersen.sdu.dk/index_e.html

Shanties and Sea Songs
Well shiver me timbers! This site offers a boatload of shanties, pilot verses and sea songs. There is also a treasure chest full of CD and book recommendations, and information on tall ships, pirates, and sailing books. You’ll be singing and sailing the seven seas in no time at all!
http://shanty.rendance.org/index.php 

State and Regional Arts Councils and Agencies
From Alabama to Wyoming, a comprehensive list of contact information for state and regional agencies.
http://artscouncil.ky.gov/Resources/Link_NAA.htm

 
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

 
Stor e Telling Columns 2002 – 2004
All 16 blog bogs, with a brief synopsis for reach one in an easy to access post at the link below.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/stor-e-telling-resources-2002-2004.html
 

2005

January February - Fables from Aesop and Robert Lewis Stevenson, spooky stories in time for Halloween, resources sponsored by the California Council for the Humanities, myths and legends from the British Isles and more.

March April - At the link you will find sites on Buddhist Studies, Cambodian folktales, lesson plans, public domain music from a variety of cultures, myths, legends and more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-stor-e-telling.html

May June - There are resources for song lyrics, lessons plans connected to our historical parks in the USA, Hodja, Birbel and Jakata stories, over 544 dragon tales and more. http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-stor-e-telling.html

2007 - 2012

Stor e Telling Columns 2007-2012
All 31 blog posts, along with a brief synopsis for each one, in an easy to access post at the link below.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html 


2013

From 1001 Night to 2001 Story Resources – This link will lead to you one blog post with all of my columns from 2013.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html 




Karen Chace 2014 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at 
storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.